SECOND HAND HOSPITAL EQUIPMENT. SECOND HAND


SECOND HAND HOSPITAL EQUIPMENT. MUSIC EQUIPMENT RACK.



Second Hand Hospital Equipment





second hand hospital equipment






    second hand
  • An extra hand in some watches and clocks that moves around to indicate the seconds

  • from a source of previously owned goods; "I prefer to buy second hand"

  • an intermediate person; used in the phrase `at second hand'; "he could learn at second hand from books"

  • hand marking seconds on a timepiece





    equipment
  • an instrumentality needed for an undertaking or to perform a service

  • The necessary items for a particular purpose

  • The process of supplying someone or something with such necessary items

  • Mental resources

  • A tool is a device that can be used to produce or achieve something, but that is not consumed in the process. Colloquially a tool can also be a procedure or process used for a specific purpose.

  • The act of equipping, or the state of being equipped, as for a voyage or expedition; Whatever is used in equipping; necessaries for an expedition or voyage; the collective designation for the articles comprising an outfit; equipage; as, a railroad equipment (locomotives, cars, etc.





    hospital
  • a medical institution where sick or injured people are given medical or surgical care

  • a health facility where patients receive treatment

  • A hospice, esp. one run by the Knights Hospitaller

  • A hospital, in the modern sense of the word, is an institution for health care providing patient treatment by specialized staff and equipment, and often, but not always providing for longer-term patient stays.

  • An institution providing medical and surgical treatment and nursing care for sick or injured people

  • A charitable institution for the education of the young











Le Jour ni l'Heure 2422 : cathédrale Saint-Canut, Sct Knud, XIIIe-XVIe s., Odense, Fionie, Danemark, lundi 20 juillet 2009, 18:41:57




Le Jour ni l'Heure 2422 : cathédrale Saint-Canut, Sct Knud, XIIIe-XVIe s., Odense, Fionie, Danemark, lundi 20 juillet 2009, 18:41:57





Wikipaedia :

St. Canute's Cathedral (Danish: Odense Domkirke or Sct. Knuds Kirke), also known as Odense Cathedral, is named after the Danish king Canute the Saint (Danish: Knud den Hellige), otherwise Canute IV. It is a fine example of Brick Gothic architecture. The church's most visited section is the crypt where the remains of Canute and his brother Benedict are on display.

* 1 History
* 2 The Second St. Canute's Cathedral
* 3 External links
* 4 References

History

St. Canute's Church in one form or another has stood on Nuns' Hill in Odense (Danish: Nonnebakken) for over 900 years.

Odense was established as the seat of the Bishop of Odense (Othinia) before 988 under the supervision of the Archbishop of Schleswig. The diocese included the southern Baltic islands of Denmark. The earliest bishops' names have not been recorded. Odense passed to the jurisdiction of Roskilde in 1072 for a short period of time before falling to the Archdiocese of Lund.

The earliest known church on the present location was a travertine church which was reported under construction by Aelnoth of Canterbury, a Benedictine monk at the nearby St. Alban's Priory in 1095. The foundations of the travertine church can still be seen in the crypt of the present building. The church was built in Romanesque style with semi-circular arches supporting a flat timber ceiling. The travertine church was built specifically to house the earthly remains of King Canute, who was murdered in the church of St. Alban's Priory in 1086.

Canute IV of Denmark, the son of King Sven Estridsen, was born about 1040 and ruled Denmark from 1080-1086. In 1075 he accompanied the Danish fleet on the last great Viking raid of that age. It is suggested that he stole relics of Saint Alban from Ely, which he deposited in St. Alban's Priory which he had founded in Odense.

Canute reigned at a difficult time in Danish history. The country was a patchwork of powerful autonomous feudal landowners. The idea of a united Danish nation was not on anyone's agenda at the time, except for that of King Canute himself. After the death of his older brother, the national assembly (Ting) met on Zealand to proclaim Canute king of Denmark. Once the assembly had shouted their approval, Canute stood up and spoke to those assembled, both peasant and nobles: "You called my brother Harald the Whet-stone, but you will learn that I will be hard as granite!" (kampesten). Soon after, he ordered the people of Halland to supply him with horses and wagons to transport himself and his household throughout the kingdom. The assembly met to discuss the king's request. The people decided that the request was not lawful according to the ancient customs and laws they all knew. Canute was enraged by what he heard. "It is your right to hold fast to your rights and laws and bear only the burdens the law allows, but you must also accept that I am free to do with mine what I will, and I forbid you to let your swine graze in Halland's Great Forest which belongs to me!" After hasty consultations the Hallanders supplied the required equipment. Canute did the same in Scania (southern Sweden). At the assembly he required men and supplies to build the new cathedral at Lund. When the assembly baulked, Canute swore he would forbid them to fish in the Oresund. Likewise they too acceded to the king's request.

Canute was a devout Christian and believed that a strong central church in Denmark would give him more power. He was instrumental in improving the nation-wide system of bishops by using his own local officials (fogeder) to collect tithes, a new tax, which were used to build the churches, hospitals and monasteries which were just beginning to be introduced into Denmark. Many people were Christian in name, but the old ways were only half-forgotten, and suspicions about foreigners ran high. Peasants were pressed hard to put food on the table and the forced tithes infuriated peasants, merchants, and nobles alike.

Canute brought about the wrath of some of his chiefs when he hanged Jarl Egil Ragnarsen, his hand-picked governor of Bornholm, and most of his household for piracy. Many nobles took to the seas on occasion looking for a quick way to bolster income. The execution of a high-ranking chief caused more than one chief to reconsider his support for such a troublesome monarch.

Canute's headaches came to a head in 1085-86, when he decided to invade England and try to take the throne from William I who was old and by some reports failing. As a close relative of Canute the Great, Canute's claim was easily as valid as that of William of Normandy's. With the co-operation of Robert I, Count of Flanders, his father-in-law, Canute ordered an armada of 1,000 Danish ships and 60 Norwegian ships to assemble at Struer in the Limfjord, northern Jutland, in the summer of 1085. As had been the tradition since the first Viking raid on England, local chiefs gathered ships, supplies, sailors, an











Le Jour ni l'Heure 2416 : Odense, Fionie, Danemark, cathédrale Saint-Canut (Skt. Knud, XIIIe-XVIe s.), lundi 20 juillet 2009, 18:37:38




Le Jour ni l'Heure 2416 : Odense, Fionie, Danemark, cathédrale Saint-Canut (Skt. Knud, XIIIe-XVIe s.), lundi 20 juillet 2009, 18:37:38





Wikipaedia :

St. Canute's Cathedral (Danish: Odense Domkirke or Sct. Knuds Kirke), also known as Odense Cathedral, is named after the Danish king Canute the Saint (Danish: Knud den Hellige), otherwise Canute IV. It is a fine example of Brick Gothic architecture. The church's most visited section is the crypt where the remains of Canute and his brother Benedict are on display

* 1 History
* 2 The Second St. Canute's Cathedral
* 3 External links
* 4 References

History

St. Canute's Church in one form or another has stood on Nuns' Hill in Odense (Danish: Nonnebakken) for over 900 years.

Odense was established as the seat of the Bishop of Odense (Othinia) before 988 under the supervision of the Archbishop of Schleswig. The diocese included the southern Baltic islands of Denmark. The earliest bishops' names have not been recorded. Odense passed to the jurisdiction of Roskilde in 1072 for a short period of time before falling to the Archdiocese of Lund.

The earliest known church on the present location was a travertine church which was reported under construction by Aelnoth of Canterbury, a Benedictine monk at the nearby St. Alban's Priory in 1095. The foundations of the travertine church can still be seen in the crypt of the present building. The church was built in Romanesque style with semi-circular arches supporting a flat timber ceiling. The travertine church was built specifically to house the earthly remains of King Canute, who was murdered in the church of St. Alban's Priory in 1086.

Canute IV of Denmark, the son of King Sven Estridsen, was born about 1040 and ruled Denmark from 1080-1086. In 1075 he accompanied the Danish fleet on the last great Viking raid of that age. It is suggested that he stole relics of Saint Alban from Ely, which he deposited in St. Alban's Priory which he had founded in Odense.

Canute reigned at a difficult time in Danish history. The country was a patchwork of powerful autonomous feudal landowners. The idea of a united Danish nation was not on anyone's agenda at the time, except for that of King Canute himself. After the death of his older brother, the national assembly (Ting) met on Zealand to proclaim Canute king of Denmark. Once the assembly had shouted their approval, Canute stood up and spoke to those assembled, both peasant and nobles: "You called my brother Harald the Whet-stone, but you will learn that I will be hard as granite!" (kampesten). Soon after, he ordered the people of Halland to supply him with horses and wagons to transport himself and his household throughout the kingdom. The assembly met to discuss the king's request. The people decided that the request was not lawful according to the ancient customs and laws they all knew. Canute was enraged by what he heard. "It is your right to hold fast to your rights and laws and bear only the burdens the law allows, but you must also accept that I am free to do with mine what I will, and I forbid you to let your swine graze in Halland's Great Forest which belongs to me!" After hasty consultations the Hallanders supplied the required equipment. Canute did the same in Scania (southern Sweden). At the assembly he required men and supplies to build the new cathedral at Lund. When the assembly baulked, Canute swore he would forbid them to fish in the Oresund. Likewise they too acceded to the king's request.

Canute was a devout Christian and believed that a strong central church in Denmark would give him more power. He was instrumental in improving the nation-wide system of bishops by using his own local officials (fogeder) to collect tithes, a new tax, which were used to build the churches, hospitals and monasteries which were just beginning to be introduced into Denmark. Many people were Christian in name, but the old ways were only half-forgotten, and suspicions about foreigners ran high. Peasants were pressed hard to put food on the table and the forced tithes infuriated peasants, merchants, and nobles alike.

Canute brought about the wrath of some of his chiefs when he hanged Jarl Egil Ragnarsen, his hand-picked governor of Bornholm, and most of his household for piracy. Many nobles took to the seas on occasion looking for a quick way to bolster income. The execution of a high-ranking chief caused more than one chief to reconsider his support for such a troublesome monarch.

Canute's headaches came to a head in 1085-86, when he decided to invade England and try to take the throne from William I who was old and by some reports failing. As a close relative of Canute the Great, Canute's claim was easily as valid as that of William of Normandy's. With the co-operation of Robert I, Count of Flanders, his father-in-law, Canute ordered an armada of 1,000 Danish ships and 60 Norwegian ships to assemble at Struer in the Limfjord, northern Jutland, in the summer of 1085. As had been the tradition since the first Viking raid on England, local chiefs gathered ships, supplies, sailors, and









second hand hospital equipment







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